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Notice of intention to pass a bylaw to designate 4097 and 4111 Bath Rd., 151 Clergy St. East, 488 Division St., 2263 and 3516-3518 Princess St., 2043 Sydenham Rd. and 815 Waterman Ave. to be of cultural heritage value and interest

April 25, 2017 -

Pursuant to the provisions of the Ontario Heritage Act (R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18)

Take Notice that the council of The Corporation of the City of Kingston intends to pass bylaws under Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18, to designate the following lands to be of cultural heritage value and interest:

4097 Bath Rd.

(Part Mile Square as in FR606640 Firstly Described; Subject to Debts in FR606640; Subject to FR161228, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Hugh Rankin Junior House.

The Hugh Rankin Junior House, built circa 1860, is an early example of a two-storey limestone farmhouse. It has associative value through its connection with the Hugh Rankin Junior, who built the house, and the Rankin and McGuin families, who owned and operated a grist mill formerly located adjacent to the subject property. The McGuin and Rankin Mill operated for almost 100 years and aided in shaping the development of the Collins Bay community. The Rankin Junior House is a landmark along historic Bath Road.

4111 Bath Rd.

(Part Mile Square, Being Part 1 on Reference Plan 13R-1652; Subject to Debts in FR271437; Subject to Debts in FR271438 & Subject to Beneficiaries Interest in FR271438; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the McGuin House.

The McGuin House, built in 1851, is a good example of a one-and-a-half storey and a two-storey limestone farmhouse with classical additions. It is associated with the McGuin family who were one of the first United Empire Loyalists families to settle in the area. Anthony McGuin Senior, who built the house, was the local justice of the peace and was instrumental in forming Collins Bay as a self-contained village. The McGuin House's distinctive architecture makes it a landmark along the historic Bath Road.

151 Clergy St. East

(Part Lot 342, Original Survey, Being Parts 6 & 7 on Reference Plan 13R-19716; Subject to an Easement over Part 6 on Reference Plan 13R-19716 in favour of Parts 4, 5, 8 & 9 on Reference Plan 13R-19716 as in FC85766; Together with an Easement over Part 5 on Reference Plan 13R-19716 as in FC85766, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as Maple Cottage.

Maple Cottage is a good example of a 1840s residence designed in the classical style. Built between 1842 and 1848, this building has associative value with its connection to the Meagher family, John McLeod and Richard Logan. Major James Meagher served in the Peninsular War and was a city councillor. The property was leased to McLeod and Logan in 1841 and they likely built the structure as a rental property for the Meagher family. John McLeod and Richard Logan were builders in the Kingston area who operated a stone quarry in Portsmouth Village.

488 Division St.

(Part Lot 24, Concession 2 as in FR329754, FR178802 Except the Easement Therein, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Bryant Stone House.

The Bryant Stone House is a good example of a classically balanced stone house. The Bryant Stone House is associated with John Bryant Junior, a local stone dealer, farmer and quarryman whose careers may have played a role in the construction of this fine stone house between 1860 and 1878.

2263 Princess St.

(Part Lot 1 South of Road, 2 South of Road, 2B Plan 60 as in FR282544 and Parts 1 to 3 on Reference Plan 13R-17819, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Beamish House.

The prominent Beamish House includes a complex of limestone buildings, with the stone barn tucked out of sight behind. The property is associated with Doctor William Moore Beamish (1808-1869) who purchased the property in 1833 and built the house by 1852. He was a prominent business man, township councillor, and practicing physician. The Beamish House is also associated with local MPP Joseph Haycock, who bought the house in 1877, and well-known local architect, William Coverdale, who designed the house and its early additions and who is responsible for the design of a number of prominent heritage buildings in Kingston. The Beamish house is a landmark in the historic Cataraqui Village.

3516-3518 Princess St.

(Part Lot 3, Concession 3  Western Addition, Being Parts 2 & 3 on Reference Plan 13R-759, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the John Powley House.

The John B. Powley House is a representative example of a classically balanced two-storey limestone building. The property is associated with John B. Powley, who, in 1852, sold portions of this land to facilitate the settlement of Westbrook and likely built this house before the land was divided. The Powley family was a prominent landowner in Westbrook and operated the local Powley Saw Mill. This early limestone building is tied to the development of Westbrook and is important to maintaining the historical integrity of the streetscape.

2043 Sydenham Rd.

(Part Lot 18, Concession 5, Being Part 1 on Reference Plan 13R-4194, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Guess Farmhouse.

The Guess Farmhouse is a good example of an early 19th century Ontario vernacular limestone farmhouse with a one-storey stone addition that adjoins a stone outbuilding to the northwest. The property is associated with the Guess family who had owned the property since 1824. Micajah Guess was a farmer, yeoman, township councillor, justice of the peace and road master. The house was built prior to 1851, and a half-storey was added to it by 1861. The Guess Farmhouse contributes to the character of Sydenham Road and its distinctive architecture makes it a landmark.

815 Wartman Ave.

(Lot 6, Plan 1358; Part Lot 5, Plan 1358, Being Parts 1-3 on Reference Plan 13R-11024; Subject to FR136274; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Edward Horsey Cottage.

The Edward Horsey Cottage is a good example of a mid-19th century one-and-a-half-storey ‘L'-shaped Italianate Villa-style house. The Horsey Cottage is associated with well-known local architect and builder, Edward Horsey (1809-1869), who is noted for designing a number of national historic sites in Kingston, namely: Elizabeth Cottage; the Frontenac County Courthouse; and a number of buildings at Kingston Penitentiary. Horsey came into possession of the property in 1849 and built the house circa 1862. The property is located on the edge of what became known as Horsey Bay on Lake Ontario. The Edward Horsey Cottage's distinctive architecture makes it a landmark along Wartman Road and Horsey Bay.

Additional information, including a full description of the reasons for designation is available upon request from Ryan Leary, senior heritage planner, planning, building & licensing services at 613-546-4291, ext. 3233, or at rleary@cityofkingston.ca during regular business hours.

Any notice of objection, setting out the reason for objection and all relevant facts, must be served upon the city clerk within 30 days of the first publication of this notice.

Dated at the City of Kingston
This 25th day of April, 2017

John Bolognone, city clerk
City of Kingston