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Notice of Intention to pass a bylaw to designate 426, 428, 430, 432, 434 and 436 Princess St., also known as Vaughn Terrace, to be of cultural heritage value and interest

February 3, 2015 -

Pursuant to the provisions of the Ontario Heritage Act (R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18)

Take notice that the council of the Corporation of the City of Kingston intends to pass a bylaw under Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18, to designate the lands at 426, 428, 430, 432, 434 and 436 Princess Street, (Plan C15, Part Lot 1-2, City of Kingston) also known as Vaughn Terrace, to be of cultural heritage value and interest.

Vaughn Terrace is a representative example of an Italianate-style row house built c.1876. Despite alterations to openings and porches, the plan and proportions of the row house units are basically intact, and it retains many exterior features associated with the style. Exterior detailing such as the evenly coursed stone foundation with hammer-dressed voussoirs and top course, the wooden cornice and porch and window decoration, shows a high level of craftsmanship.

Built by Roy G. Vaughn as a rental property c.1876, Vaughn Terrace was passed to his daughter Cornelia Marcia Vaughn Pense (c.1850-1897) and her husband Edward J.B. Pense (1848-1910) and their children. Edward Pense was a prominent Kingston politician and editor of the British Whig. He served as alderman, mayor, school trustee and Member of the Legislative Assembly for Kingston. The Pense family used Vaughn Terrace as an in come property for almost 60 years before the units were sold to separate owners.

The individual units of Vaughn Terrace form a residential streetscape that reflects the 19th century development of Princess Street. As the only example of 19th century terrace housing on Princess Street between Division Street and Bath Road, Vaughn Terrace functions as a landmark in its surroundings.

Additional information, including a full description of the reasons for designation is available upon request from Ryan Leary, senior heritage planner, planning, building & licensing services at 613-546-4291, ext. 3233, or at rleary@cityofkingston.ca during regular business hours.

Any notice of objection, setting out the reason for objection and all relevant facts, must be served upon the city clerk within 30 days of the first publication of this notice.

Dated at the City of Kingston
this 3rd day of February, 2015

John Bolognone, city clerk
City of Kingston