Notice of Intention to Pass a Bylaw to Designate 440 King S. West also known as St. Helen’s to be of Cultural Heritage Value and Interest - Notice of Intention to Pass a Bylaw to Designate 440 King S. West also known as St. Helen’s to be of Cultural Heritage Value and Interest

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null Notice of Intention to Pass a Bylaw to Designate 440 King S. West also known as St. Helen’s to be of Cultural Heritage Value and Interest

November 25, 2014 -

Pursuant to the Provisions of the Ontario Heritage Act (R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18)

Take Notice that the Council of The Corporation of the City of Kingston intends to pass a Bylaw under Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18, to designate the lands at 440 King St. West, (Part Farm Lot 21, Concession 1 (AKA Concession Broken Front), Being Part 1 on Reference Plan 13R-4083; Subject to FR131763, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac) also known as the St. Helen's, to be of cultural heritage value and interest.

440 King St. West, known as St. Helen's, (Part Farm Lot 21, Concession 1 (AKA Concession Broken Front), Being Part 1 on Reference Plan 13R-4083; Subject to FR131763, City of  Kingston, County of Frontenac) is of cultural heritage value and interest because of the physical/design value of three of the buildings on the property: St. Helen's, the Red Cross Lodge and the Grant/Morton House. St. Helen's, built in 1837, is a Regency villa in the Picturesque tradition, made of brick and clad in pebbled stucco with wood trim and a
metal roof. A number of interior features also contribute to its physical/design value, including fireplaces, doorways, the staircase, the interior window surrounds, and the interior of the main door with elliptical fan light transom and sidelights. The Red Cross Lodge is a one-storey brick building, clad in stucco and siding with a full walkout basement. It was built c.1845 and is an original outbuilding for St. Helen's. The Grant/Morton House is a two-storey stone building built in the early 1840s as part of the Morton's Brewery and Distillery, which operated on the adjacent lands.

The property has historical value through its direct association with three themes, two events and three persons of significance to the history of Kingston, namely Thomas Kirkpatrick (politician, lawyer and businessman), James Morton (businessman) and E.J.B Pense (newspaper publisher). St. Helen's is associated with the worldwide trend of building large Regency villas on country estates on the outskirts of cities; the early industrial development of Kingston; and public ownership of the property starting with the Sydenham Military Hospital in 1918 and ending with Correctional Service Canada. St. Helen's is also associated with the creation of the town of Kingston and the election of its first mayor (Kirkpatrick) as well as Kingston's preparation to host Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, in 1860 as a guest at St. Helen's.

The property also has contextual value as one of the last and best preserved examples of large country estates that once lined King Street West. St. Helen's is a landmark along King Street West and is historically and visually linked to its surroundings, including the former Morton's Brewery and Stone Gables.

Additional information, including a full description of the reasons for designation is available upon request from Ryan Leary, Senior Heritage Planner, Planning & Development Department at 613-546-4291, ext. 3233, or at rleary@cityofkingston.ca during regular business hours.

Any notice of objection, setting out the reason for objection and all relevant facts, must be served upon the City Clerk within 30 days of the first publication of this notice.

Dated at the City of Kingston
this 25th day of November, 2014

John Bolognone, City Clerk
City of Kingston

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