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PROJECT  PHASES

Project timeline

 

 

Phase I: Environmental assessment and the action plan (2009 to 2013)

The environmental assessment was completed in 2013 and summarized in the Third Crossing Environmental Study Report  which included recommendations for a third crossing based on a series of in-depth studies.

Results included:

  • Identifying a need for the bridge to reduce traffic congestion and travel times, and improve emergency vehicle access to the east end.
  • Identifying the best location for a bridge connecting Gore Road and John Counter Boulevard
  • Identifying possible environmental impacts and mitigation measures including those to: neighbourhoods, marine life, plants and wildlife, shorelines, noise, watercraft navigation, intersection with other transportation routes and more.
 

Environmental Study Report

View the complete Environmental Study Report and appendices.

Third Crossing Action Plan

On February 19, 2013, council received a staff report  that outlined the required steps to make the Third Crossing project to be "construction-ready." 

Part of this work was to update the Kingston Transportation Master Plan and the Development Charges Bylaw.

The provincial government requires that municipalities update their transportation master plans and their development charges bylaws every five years. City staff used this opportunity to incorporate the recent Third Crossing traffic information into the 2014 Transportation Master Plan. This work would verify whether Kingston needed additional capacity to cross the river. The traffic studies confirmed  that a third crossing was justified and reconfirmed in the newly updated 2015 Kingston Transportation Master Plan

It is important to note that Kingston's population is predicted to peak in the early 2030s and then start to decline. The forecast for declining population growth, coupled with expected improvements to other types of transportation, including walking, cycling and transit; changes in transportation technologies; promotion of transportation demand management strategies; changes in population demographics and magnitude of infrastructure capital costs are factors that influenced the number of travel lanes planned for the bridge. The Third Crossing will be a two-lane rather than the originally conceived four-lane bridge.  

An update to the development charges bylaw was completed on September 9, 2014. Development charges are one of the sources of funding for design and construction of the Third Crossing in addition to capital reserve funds and possible grants and/or user fees. Phase 1 of the Third Crossing Action Plan is complete. 

In early 2015, further development of a third crossing became a council priority.

On Sept. 15, council approved moving forward with phases two and three of the Third Crossing Action Plan to ensure the project is "shovel-ready" should grant/funding opportunities become available from upper levels of government.


Phase II: Preliminary design (February 2016 to May 2017)

 

 

January 2016: Contract awarded for preliminary design

On January 12, 2016, council awarded the preliminary design assignment to J.L. Richards . This offered the City the best value in response to the request-for-proposal (RFP) process.  J.L. Richards is a local and reputable engineering firm that will incorporate creative solutions to minimize the overall construction and maintenance costs of the bridge while maximizing its performance and sustainability.

City staff will be working with J.L. Richards to build upon the conceptual design information provided in the Third Crossing Environmental Study Report. The scope of the preliminary design work is outlined below.

March to December 2016: Field investigations and reporting

Detailed site investigations will be carried out in the March to December timeframe. These studies include:

  • Geo-technical engineering: Holes will be bored into the bedrock at  proposed pier locations to complement existing geo-technical information.
  • Utilities coordination for hydro, water, and sanitary systems
  • Hydrogeology: Groundwater analysis work and  tests will be carried out to see whether any mitigation measures are needed.
  • Bio-acoustical engineering: Studies will identify any impacts of noise and vibrations on aquatic and land animals.
  • Geo-environmental engineering: Studies will be carried out in the area including collecting samples from the John Counter Boulevard area and the water boreholes for chemical analysis.
  • Functional design: Review of arch and pier locations, bridge alignment, road cross-section, landscape and structural refinements.
  • Cultural-natural heritage assessment: Building on information from the environment assessment, work will identify any significant species habitats and other sensitive natural features. This includes: bird surveys, frog-and-turtle surveys and evaluations of communities of land animals. Work will respect the natural and cultural heritage values of this part of the Rideau Canal and minimize the impacts of construction.
  • Transportation noise assessment: A noise assessment will be done in noise-sensitive areas including residential subdivisions to complement existing noise study information.     

June & July 2016: Prepare a draft design concept for bridge, roadway and landscape

  • Third Crossing InfographicDesign criteria will be used to refine the preferred concept for the bridge. These criteria include: consideration of comparative cost estimates, traffic impacts, pedestrian and bicycle accommodation, environmental impacts and overall aesthetics. Alternative design concepts will be developed for arch configuration, bridge railings and lookouts, pathway links, curbs and sidewalk treatments, retaining and noise walls and other items. Preliminary drawings and 3D renderings will be prepared.

August 2016 to March 2017:

  • Environmental Impact Analysis: Parks Canada's mandate ensures that  projects on the lands and waters it manages must go through an environmental impact analysis to assess the impacts that the project will have on the environment such as effects on natural and cultural resources, visitor experiences, human health and impacts to First Nations communities.

September 2016: Open house #1

  • A public open house will be held in September to show the draft design concept for the bridge, roadway and landscape. City staff and representatives from the consulting teams will be on hand to answer questions.

November 2016 to April 2017: Cost estimates

  • Once the preferred option is known for the bridge design, cost estimates will be updated. This will link with the business planning phase during which a financing model will be recommended.

April 26 and 27, 2017: Open house #2

  • Public open houses were held on April 26 and 27, 2017 to show the draft design for the bridge, roadway and landscape. City staff and representatives from the consulting teams were on hand to answer questions. 

May 2017: Draft reports for the preliminary design summary report

View the complete draft preliminary design summary report and appendices.

This report provides a summary of the preliminary design activities: 

  • Pier locations
  • Road way cross-section and intersection layouts Bridge structure components
  • Curb, sidewalk and pathway requirements
  • Retaining and noise walls
  • Lighting
  • Landscaping
  • Utilities
  • Construction cost estimates
  • Cultural-natural heritage protection plan
  • Community action plan
  • Natural environment enhancement plan
  • Public consultation summary. Documentation of the decision-making process

June 2017: Council considers final report and votes to build the Third Crossing.

On Wednesday, June 14, Kingston City Council voted to build the Third Crossing with a budget of $180 million contingent on two-thirds of the funding coming from the provincial and federal governments (minimum $120 million).

The province announced on Tuesday, June 13, that it will commit its share of this funding – $60 million.

The City will now work alongside the province to secure the remaining third of the funding needed – a grant of $60 million – from the federal government before any further work gets underway. The project team will continue to reach out with project updates and information as they become available.

Phase III: Business plan (May 2016 to March 2017)

The business plan phase includes:

September 2016: Open house #1

  • A public open house will be held in September (see phase II) to report and seek feedback on the economic model.

November & December 2016: Final report

  • Solicit feedback from residents on the economic model and cost-benefit analysis and finalize report.

June 2017: Council considers final reports and votes to build the Third Crossing.

On Wednesday, June 14, Kingston City Council voted to build the Third Crossing with a budget of $180 million contingent on two-thirds of the funding coming from the provincial and federal governments (minimum $120 million).

The province announced on Tuesday, June 13, that it will commit its share of this funding – $60 million.

The City will now work alongside the province to secure the remaining third of the funding needed – a grant of $60 million – from the federal government before any further work gets underway. The project team will continue to reach out with project updates and information as they become available.


Phase IV: Detailed design

This plan will be developed if council directs staff to move forward with the project.