Celebrating Canada at 150

Kingston is at the heart of Canada's story – shaping our past, building our future.

In 2017, Canada celebrates the 150th anniversary of Confederation. During this historic year, Canadians from coast-to-coast-to-coast will celebrate our great country – its stunning environment, diverse peoples and unique cultures – in meaningful ways.

Kingston invites Canadians to join celebrations in the city where much of it began. Bold, inclusive and authentic events are planned to honour our past and build excitement for our future. Sesquicentennial initiatives will highlight Kingston's culture, creativity and innovation and explore our role in shaping Canada.

Kingston, a city of Canadian firsts

These Kingston-based firsts have helped shaped the fabric of Canada:

  • In 1841, the government of the United Province of Canada met in Kingston, its first capital from 1841 to 1844, and started the conversation that continues to define Canada as a democratic nation.
  • Kingston is known as the home Sir John Alexander Macdonald, the first prime minister of Canada and the "Father of Confederation." Without Kingston's Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada as it is today would not exist.
  • In 1856, the Grand Trunk Railway Train commenced service – the first major railroad in Ontario to connect Montreal and Toronto via Kingston.  It forever altered how commerce was undertaken in the province.
  • One cold afternoon, in the winter of 1886, a square rubber puck, cut down from an old lacrosse ball, was dropped onto the ice of Lake Ontario. Armed with crooked sticks, teams comprised of students from Queen's University and cadets from the Royal Military College faced-off in the first inter-university hockey game ever played and the first match in what would become Canada's oldest hockey rivalry.
  • The red maple leaf of the Canadian flag perhaps serves as Canada's most important and beloved national emblem. Embraced by all Canadians, the maple leaf unifies the nation. Travelers proudly stitch Canadian flag patches to backpacks to tell the world the place they call home. The maple leaf has come to stand for Canada's most important values. But did you know that the Canadian flag was designed right here in Kingston?

 


 

SESQUICENTENNIAL NEWS

Kingston and Canadian Scholarship

September 8, 2017 - This year, Canada is celebrating its 150th anniversary of confederation. Canadians from coast-to-coast-to coast will join friends, neighbours, and families to honour their...

Coming to Kingston: SESQUIdome to feature HORIZON - a 360 degree cinematic experience

August 1, 2017 - From Aug. 11 to 15, the City of Kingston is hosting SESQUI, a Canada 150 Signature Initiative, across from the Rogers K-Rock Centre.  There – inside the giant,...

Kingston's and Canadian railways

July 21, 2017 - This year, Canada is celebrating its 150th anniversary of confederation. Canadians from coast-to-coast-to coast will honour our great country in meaningful ways. Throughout...

KINGSTON MOMENTS

Kingston and Canadian scholarship

Although Kingston may seem like a small town to some, it is a city of...

Kingston's waterways and the Canadian economy

Kingston is located at the intersection of four lines of communication...

Kingston's and Canadian Railways

From the mid-nineteenth century until 1967, Kingston’s downtown core and...

EVENTS CALENDAR

Hosted by HIV/AIDS Regional Services A Community Talking Circle, facilitated by Three Things Consulting Inc. and co-designed with community partners and indigenous leaders, to openly discuss the theme of reconciliation. The intent is to increase our overall cultural competence around indigenous issues, building on what residents know, how residents feel and how well residents put this knowledge into practice.
Start Date:
Thu, October 19, 2017 10:00 AM
Duration:
6 hours, 0 minutes
Location:
Description:

Hosted by HIV/AIDS Regional Services

A Community Talking Circle, facilitated by Three Things Consulting Inc. and co-designed with community partners and indigenous leaders, to openly discuss the theme of reconciliation. The intent is to increase our overall cultural competence around indigenous issues, building on what residents know, how residents feel and how well residents put this knowledge into practice.