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March 12 Notice of Intention to Pass Bylaws to Designate

Take Notice that the Council of The Corporation of the City of Kingston intends to pass By-Laws under Section 29 of the Ontario Heritage Act, R.S.O. 1990, Chapter 0.18, to designate the following lands to be of cultural heritage value and interest: 

2045 Middle Road (Part Lot 13 Con 2 Pittsburgh Part 1, 13R15440; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Clarke House;  

  • The Clarke House is situated on the south side of the road, just east of Murray’s Road, in the former Township of Pittsburgh, now part of the City of Kingston. This 1-hectare rural residential property contains a one-and-a-half storey Ontario vernacular limestone farmhouse, built in 1851 for the Clarke family. The Clarke House is a representative example of an early 19th century one-and-a-half storey Georgian influenced vernacular farmhouse with few alterations. The symmetrical front façade is a defining feature of Georgian architecture and is characterized on this residence by a central entrance flanked by sash windows under a medium-pitched side gable roof and twin stone chimneys at the roof ridge. The roughly coursed, randomly cut stones on all elevations as well as the inconsistent size of the voussoirs and lack of architectural embellishments are indicative of the rural, vernacular nature of this building’s construction. The Clarke House is associated with the Clarke family and their descendants, who were long-time residents and farmers in this area of the former Pittsburgh Township. With its shallow setback, limestone construction, and presence on Middle Road, the Clarke House shares a visual and historical relationship with its surroundings and is an important part of the historical rural context of the neighbourhood. Its heritage attributes include the one-and-a-half storey limestone farmhouse, with gable roof, twin chimneys and symmetrical openings.  

281 Princess Street (Part Lot 328 Original Survey Kingston City as in FR284763; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as Turk’s Furniture Store: 

  • Turk’s Furniture Store is located on the north side of the street, between Clergy and Sydenham Streets in downtown Kingston. The 6-metre wide, 240 square metre property is completely covered by the subject building, a two-storey brick commercial building constructed circa 1890. The two-storey brick building is an example of a purpose-built commercial building from the late 19th century. The prominent bay window rising to the roofline is consistent with a building designed as a store rather than a residence. Turk’s Furniture Store is associated with the Jewish-Canadian settlement area along this portion of Princess Street between Clergy and Bagot and its surrounding residential neighbourhood, which was established in the 19th century and known locally as Little Jerusalem. This property has important associative value with Jacob and Ann Turk who settled in Kingston from Russia in the late 1800s. They opened a used furniture shop in 1902. Jacob was a founding member of the Beth Israel Synagogue and acted as its president from 1919 to 1920 and an active member of the Oddfellows Relief Association. Ann was also very involved in Beth Israel as a member of the women’s Zionist organization Hadassah. Turk’s Furniture Store remained in the Turk family for four generations until it closed in 2012. Turk’s Furniture Store has contextual value as it supports and maintains the historic and eclectic commercial character of lower Princess Street. The building’s narrow frontage, distinctive bay window and deep cornice, makes this property a landmark along Princess Street for its unique design. Its heritage attributes include the two-storey brick building with projecting two-storey bay, large window openings and decorative wooden details. 

322 Division Street (Part Lot 24 Block PP Con 1 Kingston as in FR303826 Except the Easement therein; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac): 

  • Located on the west side of Division Street, just north of Hamilton Street in the City of Kingston. The 265 square metre property contains a one-and-a-half-storey limestone residential building constructed circa 1852. The property has design value as an early and representative local example of a one-and-a-half-storey vernacular limestone residential building with a Georgian influence. The residence retains all the symmetry and balance characteristic of Georgian architecture. This style is expressed through the structure’s medium-pitched side gable roof with central gable, centrally placed first-floor entrance, flanked by large symmetrical window openings on the façade, and a half-round arched central window opening under the gable on the second floor. The surviving window and door openings, and hammer-dressed, evenly squared limestone exterior and early date, make it a representative example of this style of architecture in Kingston. The property has contextual value for its role in supporting and maintaining the historic scale and character of this portion of Division Street. The property is visually linked to this section of Division Street, which is defined by 19th and early 20th century residential buildings with shallow setbacks from the public right-of-way, whose overall scale and character create a gateway to the historic downtown. Its heritage attributes include the one-and-a-half storey limestone building with its gable roof, central gable and original openings.  

3578 Highway 38 (Part Lot 5 Con 7 Western Addition Kingston as in FR306279 Lying North of FR692323; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Vanluven Farmstead: 

  • The Vanluven Farmstead is situated on the northeast side of the road, facing the terminus of Quabbin Road, in the former Township of Kingston, now part of the City of Kingston. This 20-hectare rural property contains a one-and-a-half storey Ontario vernacular limestone farmhouse with single-storey addition, built circa 1850 for the Vanluven family. A small stone farm building with a chimney and several wooden barns are also present on the property. The Vanluven Farmstead is an early example of a 19th century one-and-a-half storey Georgian influenced vernacular farmhouse with various architectural elements that display a high level of craftsmanship. The symmetrical front façade characterized by a central entrance flanked by windows under a shallow-pitched gable roof and single stone chimney is representative of the Georgian style dwelling. The main entrance is exaggerated by a vestibule with arched sidelights, a hipped roof with dentil decoration, engaged square columns located at the corners of the vestibule, and arched windows. The high degree of craftsmanship is also evident in the smooth ashlar quoins, and deep cornice with wide frieze board and returns. The window openings also have a slight arch that is embellished with segmental stone voussoirs. The Vanluven Farmstead is associated with the Vanluven family who were well-known and active members of the Murvale community. By 1851, Leonard and his wife Catherine were operating a successful farm and living in the single-storey stone house on the property with their children. The Vanluven Farmstead has contextual value as it supports and maintains the scenic and rural character of the road and area. It is important to note that the contextual value of the property is expressed not only through the limestone farmhouse, but also the historic stone outbuilding with chimney, and multiple agricultural buildings. Its heritage attributes include the one-and-a-half storey limestone farmhouse with gable roof, stone chimneys, symmetrical front façade, and central entrance vestibule; one storey stone addition; and limestone outbuilding with single limestone chimney.  

384 Division Street (Part Lot 8 W/S Division Street Plan A13 Kingston City as in FR335913 Except Part 1 13R19840; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Hoagie House: 

  • The Hoagie House is located on the southwest corner of Division and Stanley Streets in the City of Kingston. The 500 square metre property contains a detached two-storey limestone residential building, constructed before 1855. The first floor of the building was converted for commercial uses many years ago and has been the location of the well-known local establishment – The Hoagie House - since 1971. The property has design value as an early surviving example of a two-storey vernacular limestone residential building with a Georgian influence in Kingston. The Hoagie House retains the symmetry and balance characteristic of Georgian architecture, expressed through its low-pitched side gable roof, centrally placed first-floor entrance, and symmetrical alignment of window openings on the façade, including a possible blind window behind the wooden shutters on the second floor. Its full two-storey massing (as opposed to one-and-half) is unusual and notable for its early construction date. Located on a corner site and as one of only a few limestone buildings along this stretch of Division Street, the Hoagie House contributes to, and supports, the historic scale and character of Division Street south of Concession Street, which traditionally formed the western boundary to the city. The Hoagie House is visually linked to this section of Division Street, which is defined by 19th and early 20th century residential buildings with shallow setbacks from the public right-of-way. Its heritage attributes include the two-storey limestone building with gable roof, and original window and door openings.  

390 King Street East / 42 Queen Street (Part Lot 93 Original Survey Kingston City; Part Lot 100 Original Survey Kingston City as in FR447579; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac): 

  • The subject property is an approximately 287 square metre lot located on the south-western corner of King East and Queen Streets in downtown Kingston. The two-storey stone commercial building on the site covers the entirety of the property. The property has physical value as a representative example of a two-storey limestone commercial building constructed on a prominent corner in Kingston’s downtown. The King Street elevation includes two large segmentally arched openings with stone voussoirs on the ground floor and five rectangular window openings, equally spaced, on the second floor. The Queen Street two-storey façade features nine bays, all with stone voussoirs, including two tall ground floor door openings. The property has historical/associative value as an early commercial building in the historic commercial core of the City. It sits at a prominent intersection and contributes to the community’s understanding of commercial growth during the middle of the nineteenth century. In the early days, the building housed a bank and manager’s residence. Notable associates of the bank include Thomas Kirkpatrick, Bank Solicitor from 1837 to 1866 (and Mayor of Kingston in 1838 and 1847); John Macaulay, agent from 1822 to 1866 and William Hinds, bank manager 1855 to 1866, (and Director of the Cataraqui Cemetery Company, and Life Governor of the General Hospital and Frontenac Loan & Investment Society). From 1873 until 1908, the building housed a carriage works business. Although the property changed hands multiple times between 1907 and 1912, it housed a brass and iron foundry for much of the first half of the 20th century. The property is important in maintaining and supporting the 19th century character of the Queen Street streetscape, as well as the commercial core of the City of Kingston. The building shares a city block with other significant heritage properties and serves to anchor the historical streetscape of Queen Street west of King Street East. Its design and material also function as a physical connection to the long history of commercial and industrial use of Kingston’s “North Block”. Its heritage attributes include the two-storey limestone commercial building with cross-gable roof, regular fenestration pattern including the two wide arched openings on King Street.  

3994 Howes Road (Part Lot 9 Con 5 Western Addition Kingston Part 3 13R549; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Stevens Farmhouse: 

  • The Stevens Farmhouse is situated on the north side of the road, near the western limit of the municipality, in the former Township of Kingston, now part of the City of Kingston. This 0.4-hectare rural residential property contains a one-and-a-half storey limestone farmhouse built in the 1860s for the Stevens family. The Stevens Farmhouse is a well-crafted example of a one-and-a-half storey, mid-19th Century, Ontario Gothic Revival Cottage with excellent limestone construction and fine masonry work that display a high level of craftsmanship. The building is typical of the Ontario Gothic Revival Cottage, as demonstrated through the symmetrical façade, gable roof, a central steeply pitched gable with a window and entranceway underneath that are flanked by large rectangular window openings. The Stevens Farmhouse is unusual for a vernacular building, however, with its oversized flat-headed main entrance with side lights and transom, flanked by large window openings. The flat heads are embellished by tall stone voussoirs. The central window opening above the main entrance has a dramatic half round arch with radiating stone voussoirs. The high degree of craftsmanship is evidenced by the neatly dressed and squared stones, laid in even courses along the main/south façade and side/west elevation, as well as the tall voussoirs above the openings and smooth stone sills beneath. Its heritage attributes include the one-and-a-half storey limestone farmhouse with gable roof with central gable, grand central entrance and symmetrical fenestration.  

605-607 Bagot Street (Lots 1-2 Plan D9, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac); and 

45 Charles Street (Lot 3 Plan D9, City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Calvary Church: 

  • The Calvary Church is located on the northeast corner of Bagot and Charles Streets in the Inner Harbour neighbourhood in the City of Kingston. The Calvary Church spans two properties (a total of 957 square metre) and consists of a one-storey frame church constructed in 1889 with later additions and alterations in 1910 and 1924. The Calvary United (formerly Congregationalist) Church has design and physical value as a rare example of a surviving 19th century frame church in Kingston. The original 1889 chapel footprint is rectangular (15 metre by 7.5 metre) with a gable roof running north south. The principal end gable with large Gothic Revival style window faces Charles Street and a gabled entrance vestibule faces Bagot Street, thereby taking advantage of the corner location to provide views to and architecture interest of the building from both streets. The early 20th century modifications include an addition to the east for the Sunday school, the insertion of Gothic Revival style tracery within the original rectangular window openings, and the application of stucco to unify the enlarged church. The Calvary Church has historical value because it yields information that contributes to an understanding of the development of the surrounding neighbourhood known as Charlesville. At the time of its construction in 1889, it was the only Congregational church between Queen Street and the Outer Station. The church’s size and frame construction reflect the modest means of this 19th century working-class neighbourhood at the northern edge of Kingston as well as the aesthetic sensibilities of the Congregationalist members. Calvary Church has associative value for its connections to James Bruce Reid, who designed the original chapel, and architect Colin Drever who oversaw later 20th century alterations and additions. The Calvary Church has contextual value because it is historically linked to its surroundings and is an historic landmark in the neighbourhood. As the only church in the former Charlesville hamlet, Calvary Church was built to serve the local community of working-class families and has been a local gathering place for generations. Its heritage attributes include the one-storey chapel with side addition, entrance vestibule, original window openings and large Gothic Revival style arched window.  

75-77 Princess Street / 52-56 Queen Street (Lot 105 Original Survey Kingston City; Lot 106 Original Survey Kingston City; Part Lot 100 Original Survey Kingston City; Part Lot 3 Plan C4 Kingston City as in FR390311 S/T & T/W FR390311; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the Moore Building: 

  • The Moore building is located on the north side of Princess Street between Wellington Street and King Street East in the heart of downtown Kingston. The property extends the full depth of the block and includes frontage onto Queen Street. The Moore building consists of a two-and-a-half-storey limestone commercial building facing Princess Street, originally constructed in 1817, and various wood, brick and limestone additions extending the full depth of the block to Queen Street. The Moore building is an early example of a stone commercial building in Kingston. The two-and-a-half storey limestone section of the building facing Princess Street was constructed and open for business by 1817. The limestone building has expanded to fill the lot northward to Queen Street with numerous wood, brick and stone additions, some built as early as 1829. The portion of the building closest to Queen Street is a one-and-a-half storey limestone structure with a low-pitched gable roof, built around 1865. The building was originally known as Moore's Coffee House, which was opened in the fall of 1817 by proprietor John Moore. It functioned as a Public House for travelers between Montreal and Toronto. By 1826, it was known as Moore's Mansion House Hotel, operated by Sarah Moore. By 1830 Segro and Mrs. Carmino rented the premises and developed a business relationship with George Mink to run the livery at the Mansion House Hotel. George Mink was a former slave, brought to Upper Canada with Loyalist Johan Jost Herkimer in 1784. In addition to the Moore’s hotel, the property and various buildings also served the community as a Grammar School, a military hospital, and a Mechanic’s Institute. The building furthest to the north, fronting onto Queen Street, was a blacksmith and boilermaker shop, and overtime housed carpenters and carriage making businesses. In 1890, the building was used as the Elliott Brothers Hardware Store. The Elliotts contributed their skilled trades to several large public works projects including: the Rockwood Asylum in Kingston; Armories in London, Toronto and St. Catharines; and the Royal Mint in Ottawa. Robert F. Elliott served as the Mayor of Kingston in 1896 and served on City Council. The building opened as Vandervoort Hardware in 1947 when Claude and Dean Vandervoort purchased the business. The store operated continuously under the Vandervoort name for almost 70 years until it closed its doors in 2020. The Moore building has contextual value as it contributes and supports the historic streetscape character of Princess Street and is visually linked to its surroundings. The buildings in this area are located at the front of their lots, which creates a compact street wall, and creates a visually appealing and diverse streetscape along Princess Street for which this building plays a key role in maintaining. Its heritage attributes include the two-and-a-half storey limestone commercial building and rear wood, brick and limestone additions, and the one-and-a-half storey limestone building fronting Queen Street.  

84 Yonge Street (Lot 39 W/S Yonge St, Plan 54; City of Kingston, County of Frontenac), known as the McCammon Bakery: 

  • The McCammon Bakery is located on the west side of the street, mid-block between Grange and Richard Streets, in Portsmouth Village in the City of Kingston. The approximately 639 square metre residential property includes a two-storey limestone house with a one-storey rear wing, and a single-storey detached wooden outbuilding in the rear yard. The dwelling was constructed in the late 1860s as a home and bakery. This property has physical/design value as a good example of a classical limestone building with a Georgian influenced simple rectangular side-gable plan, built to accommodate both residential and commercial uses. The central doorway is recessed with paneled reveals as well as a transom and stone step, was likely the residential entrance, while the second entrance, now blinded, together with the window opening to the north, were likely the commercial entrance and display window for the bakery. The regular pattern of openings, with stone voussoirs and sills, reflect the Georgian style. While the large shed dormers dominate the roof line, the Georgian influence is still visible in the original roof profile, as well as the eave returns on the north and south gable ends. The McCammon Bakery has historical/associative value as it yields information that contributes to an understanding of the commercial and residential practices in the City of Kingston during the mid-19th century. Thomas McCammon was a baker who, with his wife Martha, purchased the subject vacant lot in 1865 and built their home and shop prior to 1869. Formerly called Main Street, Yonge Street was once the main north-south street in Portsmouth, and included a variety of commercial uses from hotels, blacksmiths, groceries, inns and breweries. The approximately 48 square metre outbuilding in the southwest corner of the property is clad in board and batten siding and has a low-pitched gable roof. It was built for storage for the bakery business and the stone bake oven that once existed in the rear yard and reflects the past commercial uses of the property for both the McCammon’s bakery and the later Hotel Westlake. The McCammon Bakery building maintains the character of the area through its limestone construction and two-storey massing; features that are visible in residential and commercial properties along Yonge Street as well as throughout the former village of Portsmouth. Its heritage attributes include the two-storey limestone building with gable roof, regular pattern of openings, and the detached wooden building in the rear yard.  

Additional information, including a full description of the reasons for designation is available upon request from Ryan Leary, Senior Heritage Planner, Heritage Services at 613-546-4291, extension 3233, or at RLeary@CityofKingston.ca during regular business hours, or by visiting CityofKingston.ca/DASH and searching by address. 

Any notice of objection to this notice of intention to designate the property, setting out the reason for objection and all relevant facts, must be served upon the City Clerk within 30 days of the first publication of this notice. 

Dated at the City of Kingston
This 12 day of March, 2024

Janet Jaynes, City Clerk 
City of Kingston 

The City of Kingston acknowledges that we are on the traditional homeland of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, and thanks these nations for their care and stewardship over this shared land.

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