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Neighbourhood Tree Planting Program

The spring 2024 sale is closed. Our next sale opens in July for tree pickup in September. Stay tuned for more details on our website!

The Neighbourhood Tree Planting Program in Kingston lets property owners buy discounted trees to plant on their land. It is part of the city’s climate action and community health work. 

You buy one or two trees at a time for $20 each from a selection of ten species. They are sold on a first-come, first-served basis. If you need help choosing, planting or having trees delivered trees please email Leaf Kingston for assistance.

Remember, you can only buy trees for properties you own in Kingston, not for friends or family. You can purchase the trees through PerfectMind, the city's online portal, or in person at the INVISTA Centre or Artillery Park during the sale period.

Tree planting guide 

To ensure your tree grows well make sure to choose the right spot and plant it correctly on your property. 

Choose the right spot

1. Room to Grow: Consider how large your tree will be at maturity and ensure it is planted at a safe distance from your home, driveway and sidewalk. Trees are not to be planted on the public right-of-way. 

2. Utility Boxes: Typically located in the public right-of-way. Do not plant trees next to these. 

3. Spacing between trees: Trees vary in size, shape, colour and care. Leave at least five to six metres between trees when planting.

4. Public right-of-way: Trees in this area are owned and maintained by the City. Do not plant trees in this area. Know your property line before planting near the public right-of-way.

5. Overhead wires: Trees on both private and public property will be pruned if they are within three metres of overhead wires. Consider the space needed from overhead wires for the tree at maturity.

Planting your tree 

After you have your tree and the perfect spot, plant it in five simple steps:  

    • Locate utility lines: Make sure there is no interference and proper clearance from utility infrastructure 
    • Dig a Hole: Make a shallow hole as deep as the root ball and three times as wide. The root ball is the mix of roots and soil at the base. 
    • Prepare the Roots: Take the tree out of its container and gently separate the roots. Make sure you can see part of the trunk where it meets the roots. 
    • Position the Tree: Put the tree in the hole, align it, and fill it with soil, packing it firmly. 
    • Water: Water the soil around the tree, using about 1/3 of the container's volume. 
    • Mulch: For added protection, add a thin layer of mulch around the tree. Do not use fertilizer for the first two years while the roots establish, and water regularly in dry periods.

Choosing the right tree

Ten different species of trees are available to purchase. Trees vary in size, shape, colour and care. Review the tree descriptions below to find the right tree for your property. 

Malus domestica 'Cortland'

Tree shape: Mature heights of two to four metres, tight crown at juvenile age, pruning to encourage umbrella shape to support the weight of the fruit as the tree matures. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; deep green leaves throughout the summer, turning a yellowish brown in the fall.  

Growing: Requires full sun exposure, adaptable to varying soil types.  

Fun facts: A cross between the Ben Davis and McIntosh apple, medium to large fruit, crisp sweet flavour; slow to oxidise making it great for salads, fruit trays and peeled and sliced on its own.

Acer x freemanii 'Autumn Blaze'

Tree shape: Average height of 15 metres at maturity, average crown spread of 10 metres. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; leaves turn a brilliant bright red colour in the fall. 

Growing: Requires full sun exposure, adaptable to varying soil types. 

Fun facts: This fast-growing tree provides excellent shade for an open space. 

Picea pungens var. glauca

Tree shape: Average height of 10 to 15 metres at maturity, average crown spread of seven to 10 metres. 

Foliage: Coniferous tree; dense needle foliage with a silvery blue colour. 

Growing: Prefers full sun exposure, adaptable to varying soil types. 

Fun facts: It provides excellent wind coverage and stands out in urban settings. This tree can be seen during the holidays in Springer Market Square. 

Malus domestica 'McIntosh'

Tree shape: Average height 2-5 metres at maturity, crown spread averaging 5 metres.

Foliage: Deciduous tree; green leaves turning bright yellow in the fall, with white flowers in the spring.

Growing: Full sun exposure, grows best on a well drained site.

Fun facts: Known as Canada’s national apple, first discovered in Southern Ontario in the early 19th century.

 

Cercis canadensis

Tree shape: Average height of 10 metres at maturity, average crown spread of 12 metres.

Foliage: Deciduous tree; unique heart shaped green leaves, vibrant pink spring blossoms in the spring.  

Growing: Prefers full sun exposure, will tolerate part shade, thrives in loam to clay loam soils. 

Fun facts: Great landscape tree, flowers early in the spring before leaf out; leaves, flowers and seeds are edible.  

Quercus rubra

Tree shape: Average height of 20 to 30 metres at maturity, average crown spread of 10 to 15 metres. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; deep forest green leaves throughout the summer, transitioning to a deep red and brown in the fall. 

Growing: Prefers full sun, tolerates moderate shade, adaptable to varying soil types and moisture levels. 

Fun facts: One of the largest tree species found in the Kingston area, some of which are best seen today around Lake Ontario Park. This majestic tree is tolerant of most urban conditions and provides excellent shade with some sun mixture. 

Amelanchier Canadensis 

Tree shape: Average height of five metres at maturity, average crown spread of five metres. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; white flowers in the spring, turning deep greenish purple in the summer, followed by a brilliant transition to deep red in the fall. 

Growing: Prefers full to partial sun, adaptable to varying soil types. 

Fun facts: An icon for garden lovers, the Serviceberry is an extremely minimal maintenance tree and fits well into landscape designs. 

Acer saccarhum 

Tree shape: Height of up to 35 metres at maturity, average crown spread of 10 to 15 metres. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; deep yellowish-green leaves during summer months, turning a vibrant red, orange, or yellow in the fall. 

Growing: Prefers full sun exposure and deep rich soils. 

Fun facts: Best known for the delicious maple syrup its sap produces; the Sugar Maple has become an icon in Canadian culture. 

Betula papyrifera 

Tree shape: Average height of 10 metres at maturity, average crown spread of five to 10 metres. 

Foliage: Deciduous tree; vibrant green leaves throughout the summer, turning a bright yellow in the fall. 

Growing: Requires full sun exposure, adaptable to varying soil types. 

Fun facts: Most recognizable for the beautiful white peeling bark that denotes the tree year-round. 

Pinus strobus

Tree shape: Average height of 20 metres at maturity, average crown spread of less than five metres. 

Foliage: Coniferous tree; long dark green needles, soft to the touch, and emits a lovely fragrance. 

Growing: Shade tolerant during early growth, prefers sandy soils, but may be adaptable to varying soil types. 

Fun facts: This iconic Canadian species was made famous by artist Tom Thompson, who portrayed the White Pine in many of his renowned paintings. 

Picea glauca

Tree shape: Average height of 10 to 15 metres at maturity, average crown spread of five metres. 

Foliage: Coniferous tree; dark green needles with dense branching. 

Growing: Shade tolerant, adaptable to varying soil types, sensitive to frost damage during early growth. 

Fun facts: An icon of the Canadian north, this hearty tree can grow nearly anywhere. It can be grouped to act as a wind break or privacy screen, and its dense branching offers a great hideout for different types of wildlife including birds, squirrels, and chipmunks. 

Frequently asked questions

Before placing an order through the program, review the frequently asked questions below. 

Yes, you can. Property owners are limited to two tree purchases per property per sale, so even if you purchased trees during the last sale, you may do so again during this one. 

Yes, you can. Property owners are limited to two purchases per property per sale, however, you may purchase trees during both sales periods. 

If you submitted an order for a tree and have not received a confirmation email, check your junk mail folder. If it is still not there, please submit a service request.

Trees will vary in size; the average size of a deciduous variety at the time of pick up will be about two metres tall and half a metre wide, weighing between nine to 18 kg (20-40 lbs.). The average size of a coniferous variety at the time of pick up will be about half  metre tall and half a metre wide, weighing 18 kg (40 lbs.) or more.

If you place an order, you must be available to pick it up during one of the designated dates. Specific dates and times will be emailed two weeks prior to pick up. Failure to pick up your trees during the specified pickup dates will result in your trees being included as part of the City’s planting supply. No refunds will be issued for trees not collected. 

All trees ordered through the Neighbourhood Tree Planting Program are final sale and orders cannot be cancelled. 

There are no refunds for trees. A tree-planting guide will be provided during pick-up dates.

The City of Kingston acknowledges that we are on the traditional homeland of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, and thanks these nations for their care and stewardship over this shared land.

Today, the City is committed to working with Indigenous peoples and all residents to pursue a united path of reconciliation.

Learn more about the City's reconciliation initiatives.

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