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Cycling

Cycling is a healthy, sustainable and affordable way to get around. To make it easier and more comfortable to get to where you need to go, The City of Kingston is improving and expanding cycling infrastructure by implementing the Active Transportation Master Plan.

Use our Walking and Cycling Facilities map to plan your route!

Cycling infrastructure

Different types of cycling infrastructure can be found across Kingston’s active transportation network.

Multi-use pathways provide a safe and separate two-way path of travel for pedestrians and cyclists. They are located next to a road in the boulevard, or in a natural off-road area. In-boulevard multi-use pathways are separated from motor vehicle traffic by a curb or boulevard. Off-road multi-use pathways, also known as off-road trails, are typically found in natural settings like forests, parks, and wilderness areas and may be paved or gravel.  

What cyclists need to know:

    • Yield to pedestrians
    • Before passing or turning, do a shoulder check for traffic
    • When passing, use a bell or horn to alert other path users of your presence
    • Ride in control and at a reasonable speed that allows you to stop if necessary
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways
    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What pedestrians need to know: 

    • Keep to the right
    • Be courteous to other path users who may be wishing to pass
    • Keep pets on a leash and under control
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways

What drivers need to know: 

    • Do not block multi-use pathways
    • When entering or exiting intersections and driveways, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to pedestrians and cyclists in the multi-use pathway
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Cycle tracks are dedicated lanes or pathways for cyclists that are separated from motor vehicle traffic by barriers, curbs, or other physical elements. They often travel parallel to a sidewalk or pathway. Cycle tracks can be designated for one-way or two-way travel.  

What cyclists need to know: 

    • Never travel the wrong way in a one-way cycle track
    • Before passing or turning, do a shoulder check for traffic
    • When passing, use a bell or horn to alert other cyclists of your presence
    • Ride in control and at a reasonable speed that allows you to stop if necessary 
    • Watch for pedestrians moving between the sidewalk and roadway
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways
    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What pedestrians need to know: 

    • Yield to cyclists when crossing a cycle track
    • Do not block cycle tracks

What drivers need to know: 

    • Do not block cycle tracks
    • When entering or exiting intersections and driveways, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to cyclists in the cycle track
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Bike lanes are a portion of the roadway that have been designated for use by cyclists. They are identified by a solid white line, pavement markings and signage. Bike lanes may also be buffered with a second solid white line between the vehicle lane and bike lane to create additional separation between cyclists and motor vehicles. In some areas of the city, buffered bike lanes are seasonally transformed into protected bike lanes with the use of bollards during non-winter months. Bike lanes are designated for one-way travel and run in the same direction as the adjacent motor vehicle travel lane.

What cyclists need to know:

    • Never travel the wrong way in a one-way cycle track
    • Before passing or turning, do a shoulder check for traffic
    • When passing, use your bell or horn to notify other cyclists of your presence
    • Ride in control and at a reasonable speed that allows you to stop if necessary
    • Watch for pedestrians moving between the sidewalk and roadway
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways
    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What pedestrians need to know:

    • Yield to cyclists when crossing a bike lane
    • Do not block bike lanes

What drivers need to know:

    • Do not park in or block bike lanes
    • When entering or exiting intersections and driveways, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to cyclists in the bike lane
    • When passing a cyclist, you are required to leave at least 1 metre distance between your vehicle and the cyclist
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Paved shoulders are typically found on rural roads next to the motor vehicle lanes that cyclists can use. They also accommodate stopped motor vehicles and emergency uses and are shared with pedestrians. Typically paved shoulders have a painted white line separating it from motor vehicle traffic and some are buffered with a second white line to create additional separation.

What cyclists need to know:

    • Never travel the wrong way in a paved shoulder
    • Before passing or turning, do a shoulder check for traffic
    • When passing, use your bell or horn to notify other cyclists of your presence
    • Ride in control and at a reasonable speed that allows you to stop if necessary
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways
    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What drivers need to know:

    • When entering or exiting intersections and driveways, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to pedestrians and cyclists in the paved shoulder
    • When passing a cyclist, you are required to leave at least one metre distance between your vehicle and the cyclist
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Sharrows are roadway markings consisting of two chevrons and a bicycle symbol. They are used on roadways that are intended for shared use by drivers and cyclists. If the road is wide enough for a bike and car to share a lane side-by-side, sharrows may be painted on the right side of the lane. Where the road is too narrow for a bike and a car to share a lane side-by-side and they must operate in single file, sharrows may be painted in the middle of the lane.

What cyclists need to know:

    • Never travel the wrong way in a roadway
    • Before passing or turning, do a shoulder check for traffic
    • Ride in control and at a reasonable speed that allows you to stop if necessary
    • Be alert and cautious when approaching intersections and crossing driveways
    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What drivers need to know:

    • Watch for cyclists and take extra caution when sharing the road
    • When passing a cyclist, you are required to leave at least one metre distance between your vehicle and the cyclist
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Crossrides are a space where cyclists are permitted to ride, rather than walk, their bike across the intersection. They usually connect to other cycling infrastructure like bike lanes and cycle tracks. Crossrides consist of signs, pavement markings, and if the crossing is signalized, a bicycle signal. Usually, pedestrian crosswalks and crossrides are next to each other but at smaller, unsignalized crossings mixed crossrides may exist in the form of a shared bicycle and pedestrian crosswalk. 

What cyclists need to know:

    • Yield to pedestrians
    • Cross at the designated space marked by pavement markings and / or bicycle signals
    • Do not pass other cyclists within a crossride. Within a mixed crossride, use your bell or horn to notify pedestrians of your presence and pass cautiously
    • Remain on your bike as you follow the directional arrows within the crossride
    • At signalized intersections, enter a crossride only when the bicycle signal turns green
    • Be alert and cautious of turning vehicles when approaching intersections
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What pedestrians need to know:

    • Cross at the designated space marked with crosswalk markings
    • Enter a crossride only when the walk signal is active
    • Be alert and cautious of turning vehicles when approaching intersections

What drivers need to know:

    • Signal your intention to turn early in order to provide the opportunity for other road users to react
    • When entering or exiting intersections, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to pedestrians and cyclists crossing or looking to cross the intersection
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

Protected intersections, also known as All Ages and Abilities (AAA) intersections, help cyclists navigate intersections more safely. Cyclists do not need to dismount because they have dedicated waiting spaces, bicycle signals, and crossrides. This type of intersection enables two-stage left turns, which means that cyclists move like pedestrians.

What cyclists need to know:

    • Yield to pedestrians
    • Cross at the designated space marked with green paint and bicycle signals
    • Do not pass other cyclists within a crossride
    • Within a mixed crossride, use your bell or horn to notify pedestrians of your presence and pass cautiously
    • Remain on your bike as you follow the directional arrows within the crossride
    • Enter a crossride only when the bicycle signal turns green
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What pedestrians need to know:

    • Cross at the designated space marked with crosswalk markings
    • Enter a crossride only when the walk signal is active

What drivers need to know:

    • Yield to pedestrians and cyclists
    • When entering or exiting intersections, signal your intent, check your blind spot, and yield to pedestrians and cyclists crossing or looking to cross the intersection
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals 

Bike boxes are designated spaces for cyclists to wait in front of vehicle stop lines. They are marked with green paint and road markings. Their positioning gives cyclists a space to wait at a red light in front of other vehicles and get into position to turn left or go straight.

What cyclists need to know:

    • Use hand signals when turning, changing lanes, or slowing down
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

What drivers need to know:

    • Do not block bike boxes
    • Yield to cyclists
    • Obey all traffic signs and signals

The City of Kingston acknowledges that we are on the traditional homeland of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, and thanks these nations for their care and stewardship over this shared land.

Today, the City is committed to working with Indigenous peoples and all residents to pursue a united path of reconciliation.

Learn more about the City's reconciliation initiatives.

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