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Pedestrians

Our pedestrian network is growing and connected, making it safer to walk to places like schools and transit. 

Pedestrian paths

Sidewalks

    • Sidewalks are sections of the public highway that are located next to roads. They are separated from the roadway to provide dedicated space for pedestrians to use.

Multi-use pathways

    • Multi-use pathways provide a safe and separate two-way path of travel for pedestrians and cyclists. In-boulevard multi-use pathways are separated from motor vehicle traffic by a curb or boulevard. Off-road multi-use pathways, also known as off-road trails, are not on paved roads or streets. They are typically found in natural settings like forests, parks, and wilderness areas.

Pedestrian crossovers

Pedestrian crossovers are marked crosswalks where drivers and cyclists must stop for pedestrians intending to cross a road. They can be identified by signs, road markings and sometimes flashing lights.

Pedestrian crossovers rules

What pedestrians need to know:

    • If it's available, press the button to activate the flashing lights
    • Approach the edge of the curb, showing your intent to cross
    • Wait for any approaching vehicles to come to a complete stop before proceeding

What drivers and cyclists need to know:

    • Keep an eye out for pedestrians intending to cross and be ready to stop
    • Come to a complete stop and wait until all pedestrians have completely crossed the road
    • It is against the law to pass any other vehicle within 30 metres of the crosswalk
    • Cyclists must dismount and walk their bikes across the road

Types of pedestrian crossovers

There are three types of pedestrian crossovers used around Kingston.

Type B Pedestrian Crossovers have signs above and on both sides of the road, pavement markings, and flashing lights that can be activated by pedestrians using push buttons.

Pedestrians crossing at a Type B crossover while vehicles wait at the yield line.

Type C Pedestrian Crossovers have signs on the sides, pavement markings, and flashing lights that can be turned on by pedestrians using push buttons.

Pedestrians crossing at a Type C crossover while vehicles wait at the yield line.

Type D Pedestrian Crossovers have signs on the sides of the road and pavement markings.

Pedestrians crossing at a Type D crossover while vehicles wait at the yield line.

Signalized pedestrian crossings

At a signalized pedestrian crossing, pedestrians press a button to activate the walk signal, which is followed by a flashing hand display. Drivers and cyclists must obey the traffic signals and yield to pedestrians and other vehicles on the road.

What pedestrians need to know:

    • Push the button
    • Wait for the walk signal to activate before crossing
    • Be cautious of vehicles turning from side streets

What drivers and cyclists need to know:

    • If approaching from the main street, obey the traffic signal
    • If approaching from the side street, stop at the stop sign and proceed only when it is safe to do so. Watch for pedestrians crossing the road
    • If a crossing guard is located at a signalized pedestrian crossing you must stop and wait and until all children and the crossing guard have completely crossed the road

Types of pedestrian signals

There are many different types of pedestrian signals used around Kingston.

Accessible pedestrian signals let people with visual or visual and hearing impairments know when they have the right-of-way to cross at a signalized intersection.

Two audible tones are used to indicate the direction of travel. A cuckoo sound indicates that the pedestrian can cross in the north / south direction and a chirp sound indicates that the pedestrian can cross in the east / west direction. The buttons can also vibrate when the signal is on.

All new intersections are equipped with accessible pedestrian signals. To request these signals at older traffic lights, please submit a service request.

Intersection pedestrian signals help people cross busy roads safely.

Pushing the button activates the traffic signal, which stops traffic and indicates when pedestrians can cross the road. Drivers turning from the side streets are controlled by a stop sign, rather than traffic signals, and they may complete their turn only when the way is clear of both vehicles and pedestrians.

A mid-block pedestrian signal includes traffic signals for main road vehicles and marked pedestrian crosswalks. Unlike an intersection pedestrian signal, there are no side streets at a mid-block pedestrian signal.

Pedestrians press a button to activate the walk signal. All road users must follow regular traffic rules.

Scramble crossings, also known as pedestrian priority crossings, stop all vehicle traffic from proceeding and turning at an intersection, including right-hand turns. This allows pedestrians to cross safely in any direction.

What pedestrians need to know:

  • When the walk signal is displayed in all directions, pedestrians can cross to any corner
  • Pedestrians may still cross in the direction of traffic when vehicles have a green light

What cyclists need to know:

  • When crossing during the scramble signal, cyclists must dismount and walk their bicycles
  • Cyclists who do not dismount must obey vehicular traffic signals, including the right-turn-on-red ban  

What drivers need to know:

  • When the scramble crossing is active, drivers are not permitted to proceed in any direction
  • When the traffic signal is green, drivers can proceed while obeying all traffic signs and signals

The City of Kingston acknowledges that we are on the traditional homeland of the Anishinaabe, Haudenosaunee and the Huron-Wendat, and thanks these nations for their care and stewardship over this shared land.

Today, the City is committed to working with Indigenous peoples and all residents to pursue a united path of reconciliation.

Learn more about the City's reconciliation initiatives.

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